Keynote Speakers

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Keynote 1: The Quantitative and Qualitative Benefits of Cloud Computing

Abstract:

The benefits of cloud computing are often corralled into a small group such as cost and business agility.  However, the benefits can also include customer experience, risk reduction, and, ultimately, firm- and industry-level strategy, wealth creation, and disruption.  This keynote will first address quantitative analysis of the cloud such as hybrid cloud cost optimization, benefits of the Intercloud, customer experience improvement through geographic dispersion and statistical advantages of service providers.  It will then expand into strategic benefits through four generic strategies, called digital disciplines: information excellence, solution leadership, collective intimacy, and accelerated innovation, which each rely on their own cloud patterns.

About the Speaker:

Joe Weinman Photo

Joe Weinman is the author of Cloudonomics: The Business Value of Cloud Computing (Wiley, 2012), which has been translated into two Chinese editions, and the Amazon #1 Hot New Release in Computers and Technology, Digital Disciplines: Attaining Market Leadership via the Cloud, Big Data, Social, Mobile, and the Internet of Things (Wiley CIO, 2014).  He is also a contributor to Regulating the Cloud (MIT Press, 2014) and a forthcoming Springer textbook on big data applications.  He is the Cloud Economics editor for IEEE Cloud Computing magazine, and has contributed to numerous print and online publications such as ForbesInformationWeekWired, and CIO.  A long time industry executive, he has held leadership positions at AT&T Bell Labs, AT&T corporate, HP, and Telx, a data center and colocation provider.  He has been awarded 22 patents in a variety of technologies, including cloud and distributed computing, mobile telephony, encryption, and voice and data networks.  He has a BS and MS from Cornell University and UW-Madison, respectively, and has completed executive education at the International Institute for Management Development in Lausanne.

 

 

Keynote 2: 10 Years of Vehicular Networking – The Quest for

Low Latency and High Reliability

Abstract:

In this keynote, we discuss the challenges and opportunities of the connected cars vision in relation to some of the most needed components in modern smart cities: improved road traffic safety combined with reduced travel times and emissions. Using selected application examples including the use of virtual traffic lights, intelligent intersection management, and platooning, we assess the needs on the underlying system components with a particular focus on inter-vehicle communication. With the standardization of the DSRC/WAVE protocol stack, the vehicular networking community converged to a common understanding of data dissemination schemes that already have high potentials for many applications. Yet, vehicular networks are way more dynamic than originally considered. Radio signal fading and shadowing effects need to be considered in the entire design process as well as the strong need for low-latency communication, fairness, and robustness. We bring all these aspects together outlining necessary ingredients for future connected cars applications.

About the Speaker:

Joe Weinman PhotoFalko Dressler is a Full Professor for Computer Science and head of the Distributed Embedded Systems Group at the Dept. of Computer Science, University of Paderborn. Before moving to Paderborn, he was a Full Professor at the Institute of Computer Science, University of Innsbruck between 2011 and 2014, and an Assistant Professor at the Dept. of Computer Science, University of Erlangen. Dr. Dressler received his M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the Dept. of Computer Science, University of Erlangen in 1998 and 2003, respectively.
He is an editor for journals such as IEEE Trans. on Mobile Computing, Elsevier Ad Hoc Networks, Elsevier Computer Communications, and Elsevier Nano Communication Networks. He was guest editor of special issues on self-organization, autonomic networking, vehicular networks, and bio-inspired communication for IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications (JSAC), Elsevier Ad Hoc Networks, and others. Dr. Dressler was General Chair of IEEE/ACM BIONETICS 2007, IEEE/IFIP WONS 2011, IEEE VNC 2014, and ACM MobiHoc 2016, TPC Co-Chair for IEEE INFOCOM, IEEE VNC, IEEE VTC, IEEE GLOBECOM, and ACM MSWiM, and Poster/Demo Chair for ACM MobiCom. He regularly serves in the program committee of leading IEEE and ACM conferences. Dr. Dressler authored the textbooks Self-Organization in Sensor and Actor Networks published by Wiley in 2007 and Vehicular Networking published by Cambridge University Press in 2014. Dr. Dressler has been an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer as well as an ACM Distinguished Speaker in the fields of inter-vehicular communication, self-organization, and bio-inspired and nano-networking.
Dr. Dressler is a Senior Member of the IEEE (COMSOC, CS, VTS) as well as a Senior Member of ACM (SIGMOBILE). He is actively participating in the IETF standardization. His research objectives include adaptive wireless networking, self-organization techniques, and embedded system design with applications in ad hoc and sensor networks, vehicular networks, industrial wireless networks, and nano-networking.

 

Keynote 3: Elastic Computing - a novel paradigm for distributed systems

Abstract:

This talk, which is based on our newest findings and experiences from research and industrial projects, addresses one of the most relevant challenges for a decade to come: How to integrate the Internet of Things with software, people, and processes, considering modern Cloud Computing and Elasticity principles. Elasticity is seen as one of the main characteristics of Cloud Computing today. Is elasticity simply scalability on steroids? This talk addresses the main principles of elasticity, presents a fresh look at this problem, and examines how to integrate people, software services, and things into one composite system, which can be modeled, programmed, and deployed on a large scale in an elastic way. This novel paradigm has major consequences on how we view, build, design, and deploy ultra-large scale distributed systems.

About the Speaker:

Schahram Dustdar PhotoSchahram Dustdar is Full Professor of Computer Science and head of the Distributed Systems Group at the TU Vienna. From 2004-2010 he was Honorary Professor of Information Systems at the Department of Computing Science at the University of Groningen (RuG), The Netherlands. He is an Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Services Computing, ACM Transactions on the Web, and ACM Transactions on Internet Technology and on the editorial boards of IEEE Internet Computing and IEEE Computer. He is the Editor-in-Chief of Computing (Springer). Dustdar is an ACM Distinguished Scientist, IBM Faculty Award recipient, and an IEEE Fellow as well as an elected member of the Academia Europaea: The Academy of Europe.